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2020.10.02

【Young Faculty:045】Kazuki Shibanuma, Associate Professor : Shibanuma laboratory, Department of Systems Innovation.



【Biography】
Mar. 2006 B.S., Department of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University
Sep. 2007 M.S., Department of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University
May 2010 Ph.D., Department of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University
Nov. 2010 Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Jun. 2013 Lecturer, Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Jan. 2017 Associate Professor, Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
Apr. 2018 Visiting Academic, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London

【About the Research】
Fracture and damage phenomena typically occur under extreme conditions in solids and structures. If we can understand such phenomena, we can reasonably control them in actual structures. The concept of structural integrity is one of the most fundamental and important themes in the field of engineering. It can be realised by models that appropriately simulate fractures/damages based on mathematics and physics. Our research group is making innovations in the modelling strategies for the structural integrity.

  • Clarification of fracture phenomena by multiscale synthesis

    Fractures are extremely complicated phenomena. Even using the latest measurement technologies, only limited aspects of a fracture can be captured. Our group is developing theories to explain the entire fracture phenomenon based on the synthesis and integration of multiple models to simulate multiscale governing factors.
  • Maintenance theories based on aging damage predictions

    Establishing maintenance systems for existing structures is an urgent issue in developed societies. Our group is developing innovative systems that can drastically improve the efficiency of conventional maintenance. By integrating phenomenological and statistical approaches we assess the aging damage of structural materials such as fatigue and creep in large-scale structures.

 

An example of proposed model: Multiscale-model for predicting fatigue life and limit of a structural component based on microstructural information of a metallic material (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2019.105339)


【Future aspirations】
I would like to publish research results that bring dreams and hopes to society through innovative approaches and innovative ideas.
Since the sabbatical leaves in FY2018, my consciousness about the research has been changed significantly. While promoting international collaboration, I would like to aim to be a researcher with an international presence by proposing approaches of originality.

【WEB】
lab : http://www.struct.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/shibanuma/